Growth, bone mass, and vitamin D status of Chinese adolescent girls 3 y after withdrawal of milk supplementation1–3

Kun, Zhu and Qian, Zhang and Leng, Huat Foo (2006) Growth, bone mass, and vitamin D status of Chinese adolescent girls 3 y after withdrawal of milk supplementation1–3. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 83 (3). pp. 714-721. ISSN 1938-3207

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Abstract

Background: A 2-y school milk intervention trial showed that 330 mL of a dietary milk supplement (fortified with calcium alone or with both calcium and vitamin D) enhanced the growth and bone mineral accretion of Chinese girls aged 10 y at baseline. Girls who received milk fortified with both calcium and vitamin D also had better vitamin D status than did girls who received nothing or girls who received milk fortified only with calcium. Objective: The aim was to evaluate whether these effects were sustained 3 y after supplement withdrawal. Design: Anthropometric measures and dietary intake were reassessed in 501 of the 698 girls whose data had been studied at the end of the intervention. As in the intervention phase, total-body bone mineral content and bone mineral density and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were measured in half of these subjects. Results: At follow-up,99%of girls had reached menarche, at a mean (SD) menarcheal age of 12.11.1 y. No significant differences in the timing of menarche were observed between the 3 groups (P 0.6). No significant differences in the changes of total-body bone mineral content and bone mineral density since baseline were observed between the groups. The group receiving calcium-fortified milk had significantly greater gains in sitting height (0.9 0.3%; P 0.02) than did the control group. The group that received calcium- and vitamin D–fortified milk had 17.16.7% lower serum 25-hydroxyvitaminDconcentrations than did the control group (P 0.04), but the difference was attenuated by additional adjustment for physical activity level (14.2 6.7%; P 0.08). Conclusion: Milk supplementation during early puberty does not have long-lasting effects on bone mineral accretion.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Leng Huat Foo is an Associate Professor in School of Health Sciences,Universiti Sains Malaysia. He is graduated PhD (Nutrition) from University of Sydney.
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
T Technology > TX Home economics > TX341-641 Nutrition. Foods and food supply
Divisions: Kampus Kesihatan (Health Campus) > Pusat Pengajian Sains Kesihatan (School of Health Sciences) > Article
Zoom Profil Pakar (Expert Profile) > Associate Professor Dr. Foo Leng Huat (Health Sciences)
Depositing User: Administrator Automasi
Date Deposited: 23 Aug 2017 10:22
Last Modified: 07 Nov 2017 18:30
URI: http://eprints.usm.my/id/eprint/36276

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